The Samuel Inman House at Peachtree and Ponce de Leon Ave not long before it was demolished in the late 1940s

The Samuel Inman House at Peachtree and Ponce de Leon Ave not long before it was demolished in the late 1940s

This was the extremely eclectic Victorian residence of John H. Barnes on Peachtree Street.  What a statement so soon after the city’s devastation during the Civil War!

 It was located on the block now occupied by the former Macy’s building and the Westin Peachtree Plaza.  There were some equally impressive mansions neighboring this one by 1890, but none of them were quite this exuberant.  Toward the end of the 19th century the home was remodeled and used by the Capital City Club before that organization built their still standing facility at Peachtree and Harris Streets.  Downtown Atlanta

(Source: cdm.sos.state.ga.us)

A wonderful photo set of the William Greene Raoul House, which was a Queen Anne mansion at 6th and Peachtree Street.  The 1891 beauty, a stylistic cousin of the still standing Peters Mansion, succumbed to fire in 1991.  It had been hidden by the construction of the American Red Cross building.  Atlanta Time Machine also has a great page with pictures of the Raoul House.  Midtown Atlanta.   

This gorgeous residence sat at the southeast corner of Peachtree and Baker Streets.  Built in 1890 and torn down in 1931 for a gas station, it was given the nickname “House of a Thousand Candles.” This GWTW blog explains why:
"But however ornate and eye-catching its exterior was, the main attraction of the Dougherty mansion remained a piece of interior design: a gigantic crystal chandelier, suspended from the roof and extending down the stairwell to the reception hall three stories below. The glittering majesty of this chandelier would give the mansion its nickname: the House of a Thousand Candles."
(via Atlanta History Center Album. John R. Hopkins Residence)

This gorgeous residence sat at the southeast corner of Peachtree and Baker Streets.  Built in 1890 and torn down in 1931 for a gas station, it was given the nickname “House of a Thousand Candles.” This GWTW blog explains why:

"But however ornate and eye-catching its exterior was, the main attraction of the Dougherty mansion remained a piece of interior design: a gigantic crystal chandelier, suspended from the roof and extending down the stairwell to the reception hall three stories below. The glittering majesty of this chandelier would give the mansion its nickname: the House of a Thousand Candles."

(via Atlanta History Center Album. John R. Hopkins Residence)

Stone mansion at Peachtree St and Ponce de Leon Avenue.  1941 - Midtown Atlanta.

Stone mansion at Peachtree St and Ponce de Leon Avenue.  1941 - Midtown Atlanta.

Circa 1895 view of the James C Freeman residence on Peachtree Street near Eighth Street. Midtown Atlanta
(via Atlanta History Center Album. James C. Freeman Residence)

Circa 1895 view of the James C Freeman residence on Peachtree Street near Eighth Street. Midtown Atlanta

(via Atlanta History Center Album. James C. Freeman Residence)

Ca. 1910 postcard view of Rhodes Hall. Midtown Atlanta
(via Atlanta Vintage Postcard- Residence on Peachtree St)

Ca. 1910 postcard view of Rhodes Hall. Midtown Atlanta

(via Atlanta Vintage Postcard- Residence on Peachtree St)